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Emerald partners with COPPUL to open up research content to Indigenous communities

Emerald Publishing has launched a pilot project to open up access to research to a selection of Indigenous post-secondary institutions and communities.

Emerald partners with COPPUL to open up research content to Indigenous communities
Vicky Williams: “Our belief is that all voices should be heard through the scholarly record, and it’s important that we don’t impose a one-size-fits all approach to participation.”

The First Voices First project is in partnership with The Council of Prairie and Pacific Libraries (COPPUL) and runs from the 21st September 2021 until the end of 2022. Through the project, more relevant information and research content will be able to get into the hands of those that need it beyond the walls of academia. Through partner libraries and colleges, communities, students and faculty will be able to freely access relevant research to improve information and literacy in post-secondary education as well as in community-based economic development projects, says Emerald.

Vicky Williams, CEO at Emerald Publishing, said: “As a publisher with a strong commitment to provision of quality information and education for all, we’re excited to be supporting this pilot study with COPPUL.

“In particular, we are interested in how this pilot can be extended beyond initial information access to participation through Indigenous scholarly authorship. Our belief is that all voices should be heard through the scholarly record, and it’s important that we don’t impose a one-size-fits all approach to participation. We look forward to listening, learning, and ensuring we respond with appropriate products and services.”

Emerald is extending access, at no additional cost, to 120 journals through COPPUL and the University of Saskatchewan to the following Indigenous post-secondary institutions and communities: Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies (SIIT), University of the North, Northlands College, Chemawawin Public Library at Easterville, Norway House Public Library, Pukatawagan Public Library, Pahkisimon Nuye?áh Library System and Muskoday First Nation.

Deborah Lee, Indigenous Studies Collection and Initiatives librarian, commented on the pilot: “As an Indigenous librarian, I’m excited to see free access to Emerald database content open up to Indigenous communities and post secondaries. It is one small step in the journey to correct historical wrongs related to research and Indigenous peoples and it warms my heart.”

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